The Riyadh series, Travel

Riyadh’s Most Beautiful Historical Secret: Old Diriyah!

“We were meant to explore this earth like children do, unhindered by fear, propelled by curiosity and a sense of discovery. Allow yourself to see the world through new eyes and know there are amazing adventures here for you.”

Laurel Bleadon Maffei

Riyadh, the capital city of Saudi Arabia, is filled with interesting and unusual things to see. From quirky restaurants to interesting historical sites, this rich city offers something for everyone. With the new tourist visa opening last year, the Saudi government has a goal of radically boosting tourism in the next ten years.

If you ever find yourself in Riyadh, or find yourself planning a trip to Riyadh, I reccomend that you pay a visit to the one and only Diriyah.

Diriyah (الدرعية) dates back to the fifteenth century and was the original home of the royal family of Saudi Arabia. It is located on the banks of Wadi Hanifa and it was the original capital city of Saudi Arabia. Now Diriyah is recognised for it’s historical value and beautiful surroundings.

I had heard many things about Diriyah from both my Saudi and Expat friends, so one afternoon I decided to pay a visit to Diriyah. After drinking a lovely cup of tea in the Tea Club, we left Riyadh Park mall and drove to Diriyah. It took approximatly eight minutes to drive there.

The biggest problem that we faced was parking: this is something that could be improved, as we found there to be very little parking space. We did manage to find a parking spot about fifteen minutes away, but this may not have been suitable for everyone.

After we found a space everything else was plain sailing. We walked down the road towards Bujairi and we could see Diriyah in the distance. As it was Friday, locals were out in full force to eat together in the park: I really love the way Saudis picnic together!

It is worth noting that Bujairi is filled with lovely coffee shops and it’s the perfect place for an afternoon stroll or wander. Please remember thought that like many places in Saudi, the shops and restaurants will remain closed until after 4pm on Fridays because of prayer.

When we walked through Bujairi, the sun was slowly setting which somehow made the Saudi architecture seem even more beautiful. There is something magnificent about the clean cut stone walls against a pale blue sky.

After walking for just under ten minutes we were able to see the Old city of Diriyah and it was beautiful. Unfortunatly, we were unable to enter Diriyah but we heard that is possible to enter after obtaining permission from an office in the Diplomatic Quarter.

Have you visited Diriyah? Let me know if you enjoyed it in the comments below. Please also write any questions that you have about Saudi Arabia, I would love to answer them for you.

The Amman Series, Travel

Jerash

The small country of Jordan, in the Middle East, is well known for it’s hospitality, culture and historical sights. From an archaeological perspective Jordan contains some of the most spectacular sites in the world including the world renowned tourist attraction that boasts over 500,000 visitors each year: Petra.

On this occasion I want to talk about the beautiful and historical aincient city of Jerash.

Jerash جرش ‎  is an aincient city located in the north of Jordan, only 48 kilometres north of Jordan’s capital city, Amman. Otherwise known as ‘the Pompeii of the East’, Jerash serves as a fantastic day trip for both adults and children.

The city of Jerash dates back to the Neolithic times and incredibly rare ruins and artifacts have been found which have dated back to roughly 7500 BC. The current site of the old city of Jerash includes beautifully preserved ruins of places of worship and other buildings from the Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine and early Muslim periods.

Recommendations

When visiting Jerash you should wear sensible footwear; if you wish to see the whole site you will need to do a lot of walking.

Take a good camera with you; Jerash is an ideal location to photograph.

In the Roman theatre, two or three men will usually be ready to play wonderful traditional Jordanian songs as you walk in. The men will be happy to play songs for you, just be prepared to provide them with a tip afterwards as this is a cultural expectation.

Before going to Jerash, read about the history of the site, so that you can spend your time admiring the beauty of the ruins.

I would advise that you take water and snacks, just be sure to clear up after yourselves.